Lobbyists across the US Calling for Surveillance Reforms – Is the Freedom Act Enough?

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As the Obama backed government tries to crack down on illegal data usage, lobbyists across the country are calling for greater surveillance reforms. These lobbyists are of the opinion that some people’s rights are being taken for granted and that the US government should do more in their fight to stop surveillance thefts without putting well abiding citizens at risk.

In 2013, two intelligence chiefs residing in the US took it up on themselves to start a public lobbying campaign to try to discourage Congress from putting away certain surveillance apparatus used in the September 11 attack carried out by terrorists on the Twin Towers in New York City.

The intelligence chiefs efforts came in the wake of steps being carried out by Republicans and Democrat senators push to make new reforms of surveillance to safeguard government and citizens interests. Since then, many companies and individuals have begun to call for better reforms in an effort to make lawmakers return to the drawing board. Many persons thought that if the Republicans and Democrats succeed with the new reforms, they would start a ban on millions of telephone calls records in the US.

The Edward Snowden situation has heightened the argument on whether surveillance laws should continue as they are, or if changes are necessary. In addition, the Boston bombing incident weighed in heavily as well as to whether the public will continue to be at risk. Furthermore, there is an argument circulating among US lawmakers as to how to better use surveillance to protect US embassies abroad.

Many tech companies are making their voice heard by calling for surveillance reforms that would hinder government spy agencies from collecting vital information in regards to phone records held by American citizens. In addition, a number of social media companies came out calling for lawmakers to keep to guidelines set out in the Freedom Act of 2015.

Twitter, Facebook and other leading technology companies are asking the government to stop their bulk collecting as they feel the public is losing “trust in the internet” because of government’s eavesdropping. Since 2009, internet giants such as Google, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, AOL, Yahoo and Apple sent an open letter to Barack Obama and Congress requesting radical reforms is carried out in the government’s surveillance approach.

However, the internet giants all agreed that something should be done about dangerous spy agencies that are causing havoc on the internet and to business growth. Government activities have done much to undermine the trust of internet users in the past and everyone who is key player is hoping government will do something to address this matter.

The Reform Government Surveillance made it clear for all to hear that “we support the bicameral, bipartisan legislation, which ends existing bulk collections practices under the USA Patriotic Act and increases transparency and accountability while also protecting US national security.” The previous quote was given in a statement by the Reform Government Surveillance some time ago.

Meanwhile Congress is taking surveillance seriously but would still like to be in control instead of having lobbyists dictate to them. Since the Patriot Act is expected to expire soon, the government is going about its business in trying to collect evidence that will prove that their collecting of records program has been effective so far in an effort to crush the challenge of lobbyists.

It may be a good strategy for the government to continue monitoring users they might suspect of carrying out unlawful internet practices that could hurt people and organizations so that everyone can feel safe. However, to build the public’s trust they should strongly reconsider to stop collecting bulk data collection of internet materials from the wider public in an effort to encourage consumer trust and business growth.

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